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Tuesday, August 25

  1. page Child's Creativity in Transmediation - Ideal Language Arts Program edited ... and Tyler Elvey LLED ElveyLLED 401 November 17, 2009 Synthesis 2009Synthesis – Ideal…
    ...
    and Tyler Elvey LLEDElveyLLED 401
    November 17, 2009 Synthesis2009Synthesis – Ideal
    ...
    in Transmediation
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    chances for success. Takingsuccess.Taking an individualized
    Gelineau, R.P. (2004). Integrating the arts across the elementary school curriculum. Belmont, CA: Thomson Wadsworth.
    Leland, C.H, & Harste, J.C. (1994). Mulitple ways of knowing: curriculum in a new key. Language Arts, 71(5), 52-59.
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Friday, August 23

  1. page *Spicing Up Your Verbs A Minilesson edited Title: Spicing Up Your Verbs By: Jessica Breighner and Delicia Burkett Location: reading corn…

    Title: Spicing Up Your Verbs
    By: Jessica Breighner and Delicia Burkett
    Location: reading corner.
    Age of children: 4th grade
    Size of class: 2 -30 students
    Prior assessment:
    We will identify writers that repeatedly use the same verbs in their writing. Any student who uses the same verb more than three times in a short piece of fiction should have this lesson.

    Materials:
    Previous fiction writing by the students, pencils, assembled “spicy verbs rack” (spice rack, empty spice jars, “boring” verbs labels, “spicy” verbs strips); In the Small, Small Pond (any book featuring vivid verbs would work); fifteen books that repeatedly use words from the “boring” verbs list
    Objectives:
    By the end of this lesson the students will be able to:
    1. identify1.identify several over-used
    ...
    and walk.
    2. identify

    2.identify
    several synonyms
    ...
    these verbs
    3. substitute

    3.substitute
    a more
    ...
    verbs.
    PSM: TheThe students will
    The students will successfully handle the spice rack.
    COG: TheThe students will
    ...
    verbs.
    AFF: TheThe students will
    The students will listen to each other’s sentences and offer constructive criticism.
    Set-Up:
    ...
    empty spice jars. Putjars.Put the “spicy”
    ...
    with the strips. Arrangestrips.Arrange the spice
    ...
    are visible.
    Context:
    ...
    familiar, easy verbs. Asverbs.As a result,
    ...
    in their writing. Iwriting.I would like
    ...
    writing.
    Introduction:
    “I

    “I
    was looking
    ...
    coming up repeatedly. Allrepeatedly.All of you
    ...
    the “boring” verbs. Althoughverbs.Although these verbs
    ...
    reading them repeatedly. Irepeatedly.I am going
    ...

    Demonstration/Modeling (Read-Aloud):
    We

    We
    will read
    ...
    vibrant, spicy verbs. Weverbs.We can stop
    ...
    spicy verbs.”
    After

    After
    reading In
    ...
    rack to students. Westudents.We have spice
    ...
    you can use. Wheneveruse.Whenever you want
    ...
    verbs, grab a spiceaspice jar and
    Shared Demonstration:
    ...
    the same verbs. Weverbs.We will have
    ...
    add “spicy” verbs. Weverbs.We will do
    ...
    to four pages. Thepages.The students can
    ...
    to substitute.
    Questions:
    1. Can you identify an over-used verb on this page?
    Guided Practice: WePractice:We will have
    ...
    walk, and run. Therun.The students will
    ...
    the over-used verbs. Weverbs.We will walk
    Directions:
    1. Find1.Find a partner.
    2. Have

    2.Have
    one person
    ...
    the table.
    3. Take

    3.Take
    turns reading
    ...
    page aloud.
    4. After

    4.After
    reading the
    ...
    that page.
    5. The

    5.The
    same person
    ...
    “spicy verbs.”
    6. When

    6.When
    that person
    ...
    a turn.
    7. Repeat

    7.Repeat
    until time
    Questions:
    1. Did1.Did your partner
    ...
    this page?
    2. What

    2.What
    verbs did you substitute?
    3. How

    3.How
    many substitute
    ...

    Independent Practice:
    We

    We
    will have
    ...
    colorful alternatives.
    Directions:
    1. Get1.Get a piece
    ...
    writing folder.
    2. Locate

    2.Locate
    at least
    ...
    your writing.
    3. Replace

    3.Replace
    them with
    Questions:
    1. Which1.Which “boring” verbs
    ...
    you locate?
    2. Which

    2.Which
    “spicy” verbs
    ...
    you substitute?
    3. Which

    3.Which
    sentence do
    ...
    better?
    Sharing/Reflection:
    The

    The
    students will
    ...
    a “spicy” verb. Thisverb.This will provide
    ...
    learned the concept. Iconcept.I will also
    ...
    colorful verbs.
    This

    This
    lesson is
    ...
    of cooperative learning. Cramerlearning.Cramer states that
    ...
    (Cramer, 2000, pg.124). Bypg.124).By having the
    ...
    in peer revision. Studentsrevision.Students can benefit
    ...
    audience for writing. (Cramer,writing.(Cramer, 124) WhenWhen Cramer discusses
    ...
    in better writing. Studentwriting.Student have the
    ...
    reformulate their papers. Bypapers.By having the
    ...
    kinds of verbs. (Cramer,verbs.(Cramer, pg. 104)
    Books featuring “spicy” verbs:
    Fleming, D. (1993). In the Small, Small Pond.New York: Henry, Holt, and Company,
    Inc.
    Lithgow, J. (2004). Carnival of the Animals. New York: Simon and Schuster.
    Kirk, D. Snow Dude. New York: Hyperion Books for Children.
    Plourde, L. (2002). School Picture Day. New York: Dutton Children’s Books.

    .

    Boring Verbs: answer,Verbs:answer, ask, run,
    Spicy Verbs:
    Answer: reply, retort, agree, disagree, respond
    ...
    Cry: sob, weep, blubber, snivel, whimper, bawl, howl, wail, shed tears
    Laugh: chuckle, snicker, hoot, giggle, snort, cackle, chortle, guffaw,
    Lithgow, J. (2004). Carnival of the Animals. New York: Simon and Schuster.
    Kirk, D. Snow Dude. New York: Hyperion Books for Children.
    Plourde, L. (2002). School Picture Day. New York: Dutton Children’s Books.
    Works Cited:
    Cramer, R.L. (2000). Creative Power: the Nature and Nurture of Children’s Writing.
    New York: Allyn.

    (view changes)

Friday, September 17

  1. page home edited Welcome to Your New Wiki! Getting Started Click on the edit button above to put your own conte…

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    5:20 am

Tuesday, December 8

  1. page Work With Standards edited Mini-lessonTeaching the commaCombine sentences in an increasingly complex and organized manner to…
    Mini-lessonTeaching the commaCombine sentences in an increasingly complex and organized manner to convey meaning.Combine words to form a complete thought
    Spicing up the verbs
    Mind mapsIdentify and use pictures charts, graphs, and captions in textRespond to text by questioning; accessing prior knowledge; reflecting, interpreting, and building on ideas; and making reasonable inferencesMake connections and form a personal response to the speaker’s messageExpress and translate ideas in graphic forms (e.g. pictures/illustrations)
    Identify and write about one specific topic (focus).
    Frame ideas for writing and identify appropriate topic-specific content.
    Participates in the writing process (i.e. pre-write, draft, revise, edit and publish).
    CentersRevise writing by adding details or missing information.
    Onomatopoeiarecognize common "buzz words" express these common words
    Setting
    Express and translate ideas in graphic forms (e.g. pictures/illustrations)
    Identify and write about one specific topic (focus).
    Write using adjectives, precise nouns and action verbs (style).
    Revise writing by adding details or missing information.
    Recognize and use mode specific characteristics of writing. (i.e. narrative, informational, and persuasive).
    Write detailed narrative pieces (e.g. stories and poems) and information pieces (e.g. descriptions, letters, reports, instructions).
    Recognize the characteristics of various types of text
    Recognize that pictures in text convey meaning
    Distinguish between real and make believe in text.
    Identify mean idea, characters, topics, events, setting, and/or plot.
    Cause and Effect
    Identify important ideas, concepts, characters, topics, events, and setting.
    Respond orally to text by questioning, reflecting on ideas, accessing prior knowledge, and participating in discussions.
    Alliteration
    Identify important ideas, concepts, characters, topics, events, and setting.
    Respond orally to text by questioning, reflecting on ideas, accessing prior knowledge, and participating in discussions.
    Round and flat characters
    Identify important ideas, concepts, characters, topics, events, and setting.
    Respond orally to text by questioning, reflecting on ideas, accessing prior knowledge, and participating in discussions
    Archetypes
    Identify important ideas, concepts, characters, topics, events, and setting.
    Respond orally to text by questioning, reflecting on ideas, accessing prior knowledge, and participating in discussions.
    Distinguish between real and make believe in text
    Conflict
    Reader's theaterIdentify important ideas, concepts, characters, topics, events and setting
    Combine words to form a complete thought
    Demonstrate the ability to hear and manipulate sounds in words (i.e.: segmenting and blending phonemes).
    Recognize that in oral language and/or print, changes in word parts and form affect meaning (i.e.: regular plurals, simple pronouns).
    Use an increasingly complex and varied spoken vocabulary.
    Recognize and identify upper and lower case letters.
    Build fluency, accuracy and prosody by reading words in connected text.
    Use an increasingly complex and varied spoken vocabulary.
    Identify and correctly use regular and irregular plurals, affixes, and inflectional endings.
    Build fluency, accuracy and prosody by reading words in connected text.
    Listen actively to increase one's own understanding by asking questions and/or retelling information.
    Make connections and form a personal response to the speaker's message.
    ZineRecognize the characteristics of various types of text
    Participates in the writing process.(i.e. pre-write, draft, revise, edit and publish)
    Distinguish fiction from non-fiction.
    Recognize different types of genre.
    Identify and use pictures, charts, graphs, and captions in text.
    Distinguish between real and make believe in text.
    Recognize that pictures in text convey meaning
    Group words, pictures and/or objects by category.
    Identify and write about one specific topic (focus).Demonstrates fluent and accurate formation (e.g. penmanship) of letters and writing.
    Read-aloudIdentify parts of a book (e. cover, title, author, illustrator, title page, table of contents)
    Listen actively to increase one’s own understanding by asking
    Deliver effective oral presentations by focusing on the topic
    employing effective delivery techniques: volume, pace, eye contact, body language, enunciation
    Use correct vocabulary and word usage when speaking
    Interact effectively in discussions by focusing on the topic
    asking relevant questions
    sharing experiences building on the idea of others
    use appropriate volume while initiating answers and conversation
    initiate and respond appropriately to conversations and discussions display appropriate turn-taking behaviors
    Listen politely to the ideas of others by facing and keeping eyes on the speaker
    Holiday celebrationsMartin Luther King, Jr. Day
    Black History MonthRead-aloud followed by questions about Claudette Colvin: Respond to text by questioning; accessing prior knowledge; reflecting, interpreting, and building on ideas; and making reasonable inferences
    Hispanic Heritage Month
    Pearl Harbor Day
    St Patricks DayHoliday symbols
    St Valentine's Day
    Arbor DayPlant a treeWrite poetry / script / story about the life of a tree: Revise writing by identifying missing information, examining logical flow of information and improving details; Write a series of sentences that relate to the topic; Write using a variety of sentence structures and descriptive word choices. (e.g. adjectives, nouns, verbs) (style); Use grade appropriate conventions of written language when writing and editing.(i.e. spelling, capitalization, punctuation, grammar and sentence formation) (conventions); Frame ideas for writing and identify appropriate topic-specific content that is supported by details. (content)
    Ancient Greek Day
    Cinco de Mayo
    Columbus Day
    HanukkahTraditionsSongs
    Lincoln/Washington's BirthdayPresidents
    Gettysburg Address DayCivil War
    Betsy Ross DayFlags
    Francis Scott Key Day
    Thanksgiving
    Harvest Festivals
    Ramadan
    Eid
    Rosh HashanahSeder Plate
    Yom KippurJewish New Year
    Chinese New Year
    Sketch-to-stretchidentify and use pictures, charts, graphs, and captions in text
    Word wallDisplay book/print knowledge appropriate to grade level
    Posters on rhetorical theoryWrite a few sentences that relate to the topic.
    Display book/print knowledge appropriate to grade level
    Demonstrate conventional penmanship, including using upper and lower-case letters, spacing and punctuationWrite a series of sentences that relate to the topic.Frame ideas for writing and identify appropriate topic-specific content that is supported by details. (content)

    (view changes)
    7:39 am

Thursday, November 19

  1. page Mini Lesson On Combining Two Independent Clauses edited {MiniLesson.docx} Type in the content of your page here.
    {MiniLesson.docx} Type in the content of your page here.
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    7:16 am
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    7:16 am
  3. page Mini-Lesson on Mind Maps edited Kayley Dull and Tyler Elvey LLED 401 November 19, 2009 Mini-Lesson – Mind Maps A mind map is a…
    Kayley Dull and Tyler Elvey LLED 401
    November 19, 2009 Mini-Lesson – Mind Maps
    A mind map is a diagram that branches out and is used to describe a word, topic, idea, or another thought. It puts a full range of cortical skills, such as word, image, number, logic, rhythm, color, and spatial awareness into one single powerful manner. Mind maps give readers and writers the freedom to use all parts of their brain and can be applied to every aspect of life where improved learning and thinking will enhance their performance. There are endless ways for students to use mind maps because there are no limits to the number of thoughts and ideas that the brain can make.
    The audience will be 4th grade students. This mini-lesson will involve the entire classroom. However, students that aren’t grasping the concept will have to be taken aside into smaller groups and be shown one-on-one how to develop a mind map.
    If students are having a problem coming up with a topic to write about, mind maps are a wonderful way to brainstorm many different ideas. It will not only benefit the children who are struggling with ideas, but also the children who not struggling with ideas. It will help those children because it will give them more interesting topics that they may be able to share with their classmates.
    Objectives
    · The student will be able to individually construct his or her own mind map.
    · The student will be able to rely on a mind map to help them expand on one topic.
    Materials Needed
    · Large sheet of white paper
    · Markers
    · Variety of children’s book
    Read-Aloud
    The book, Teddy Roosevelt, Rough Rider, will be read aloud to the students. Through this book, the teacher and students will be able to use these concepts to develop a mind map about the historical figure, Teddy Roosevelt.
    Modeling
    The book, Teddy Roosevelt, Rough Rider, will be used for modeling. The historical figure will be the main idea for the mind map. On the board, the teacher will write Teddy Roosevelt and put a circle around it showing that it is the main idea. The teacher will prompt the students by writing three additional ideas that go along with Teddy Roosevelt. The three additional ideas will be childhood, presidency, and Rough Riders. One by one, the teacher and students will go through each sub-idea and think of more ideas that go with each. For example, for the sub-idea, childhood, there could be a branch that says he was born in Manhattan. Another branch could say when he was born, October 27, 1858. Each of these would get a circle around them and connected directly to the childhood idea. The teacher will go through each sub-idea helping the students come up with at least four ideas that go along with each.
    Guided Practice
    The students will work in pairs to come up with a central idea. The teacher will always be on hand to help the students with any questions that they have. Once each group has come up with a central idea, the pairs will then work together to come up with at least three sub-ideas. As stated before, the teacher will be around to each group to make sure that they are on the right track and understand the concept on a mind map.
    Independent Practice
    It will be important for the teacher to implement mind maps in all areas of instruction to show them how valuable they can really be. Before children are asked to write, it may be helpful to ask them to come up a mind map to get their creativity flowing. Another benefit of the mind map is organization. It will help the student’s to organize their thoughts and the result of their writing will be much more clear.
    Reflection
    · What are some other reasons that a mind map could be used?
    · What was the purpose of your mind map?
    · How could this lesson be changed to be more effective?
    · Were the students still effective when they were working with their partners?
    · Would the students be able to construct a mind map on their own when trying to come up with a topic?
    Bibliography of Children’s Books
    Adler, D.A. (2002). A picture book of dwight david eisenhower. New York: Holiday House.
    Cline-Ransome, L. (2003). Satchel paige. New York: Simon & Schuster.
    Cobb, V. (2003). I face the wind. Washington, D.C.: HarperCollins.
    Coles, R. (1995). The story of ruby bridges. New York: Scholastic Inc.
    Gibbons, G. (2000). Apples. New York: Holiday House.
    Greene, C. (1988). Benjamin franklin: a man with many jobs. Chicago, IL: Children's Press.
    Pavlova, A. (2001). I dreamed i was a ballerina. New York: Atheneum Books for Young Readers.
    Pinkney, A.D. (1993). Seven candles for kwanza. New York: Dial Books for Young Readers.
    Swain, R.F. (2003). How sweet it is (and was): the history of candy. New York: Holiday House.
    Post-Lesson Reflection
    Mind maps are useful for children because it gives them opportunities to share their learning in visually interesting ways (Harvey & Goudvis, 216). It allows them to branch off from a central idea and create many more sub-ideas. Each idea that comes from the central topic helps students come up with more ideas to write about. When children work in groups, mind maps ultimately collaborative efforts as the children work together to represent their learning and thinking (Harvey & Goudvis, 216).
    Modeling is a key concept that must be used by teachers to help students get started on their mind maps. Cramer describes much of learning as being based on modeling, or imitation. Early writers will almost always imitate the teacher. It is important for teachers’ models to be specific and in great detail so the children understand the concept and can hopefully later move away from complete imitation and construct their own ideas (Cramer, 263).
    After completing the lesson, the students should have completed the objectives. The teacher should make sure the students would be able to individually construct a mind map on their own and be able to use mind maps when trying to come up with a topic to write about. Another goal that the teacher should try to accomplish with mind maps would be to have the students use their mind maps across the curriculum. The teacher should also ask himself or herself if the students would be able to write with organization by using their mind maps.
    The child’s writing is a reflection of the mind maps. In terms of the mind map, the map on paper should appear as having a central idea in the middle of the paper. From the central idea, the teacher should see arms or branches to sub-ideas or headings. The children who really have learned this concept will demonstrate branches from the sub-ideas. The mind map should almost look like a tree with many branches flowing out of a main idea. Also, if the students are using mind maps on their own without direction from the teacher, then it may be clear that the students have grasped the concept of the purpose of mind maps.
    Works Cited
    Cramer, R.L. (2001). Creative power: the nature and nurture of children's writing. New York: Longman
    Harvey, S., & Goudvis, A. (2007). Strategies that work. Portland, ME: Stenhouse.

    (view changes)
    6:27 am
  4. page *Spicing Up Your Verbs A Minilesson edited Title: Spicing Up Your Verbs By: Jessica Breighner and Delicia Burkett Location: reading cor…

    Title: Spicing Up Your Verbs
    By: Jessica Breighner and Delicia Burkett
    Location: reading corner.
    Age of children: 4th grade
    ...
    The students will successfully handle the spice rack.
    COG: The students will demonstrate the ability to substitute colorful verbs for over-used verbs.
    ...
    guided practice.
    The students will listen to each other’s sentences and offer constructive criticism.
    Set-Up:
    Steps for creating the “spicy verbs rack:” Put the “boring” verbs labels on the outside of empty spice jars. Put the “spicy” verbs strips inside the spice jar corresponding with the strips. Arrange the spice jars on the rack so that the labels are visible.
    Context:
    Beginning writers tend to stick to familiar, easy verbs. As a result, these verbs (such as eat, talk, walk, run) become monotonous in their writing. I would like to encourage my students to use synonyms for these verbs to provide variety in their writing.
    Introduction:
    ...
    Demonstration/Modeling (Read-Aloud):
    We will read a book In the Small, Small Pond that features colorful, vibrant, spicy verbs. We can stop on several pages and say, “look at all of the spicy verbs.”
    ...
    work better.
    Shared

    Shared
    Demonstration:
    We will get a book that repeatedly uses the same verbs. We will have the students work together as a class to add “spicy” verbs. We will do this for roughly three to four pages. The students can literally come to the spice rack, find the over-used verb, and pull another word out of the jar to substitute.
    Questions:
    ...
    Sharing/Reflection:
    The students will share one sentence from their writing that they altered to include a “spicy” verb. This will provide one form of evidence that they have learned the concept. I will also monitor their future writing assignments, watching for the use of more colorful verbs.
    ...
    pg. 104)
    Books featuring “spicy” verbs:
    ...
    and Company,
    Inc.

    Inc.

    Lithgow, J. (2004). Carnival of the Animals. New York: Simon and Schuster.
    Kirk, D. Snow Dude. New York: Hyperion Books for Children.
    ...
    Ask: question, request, nag, pester, beg, plead, interrogate, demand
    Run: sprint, jog, lope, scuttle, scamper, dart, dash, scurry, rush, hurry
    ...
    strut, move,
    Eat:

    Eat:
    gobble, scoff,
    ...
    gorge, swallow,
    Cry: sob, weep, blubber, snivel, whimper, bawl, howl, wail, shed tears
    ...
    chortle, guffaw,
    Lithgow, J. (2004). Carnival of the Animals. New York: Simon and Schuster.
    Kirk, D. Snow Dude. New York: Hyperion Books for Children.
    Plourde, L. (2002). School Picture Day. New York: Dutton Children’s Books.
    Works Cited:
    ...
    Children’s Writing.
    New York: Allyn.
    (view changes)
    6:22 am
  5. page *Spicing Up Your Verbs A Minilesson edited Title: Spicing Up Your Verbs Location: reading corner. Age of children: 4th grade Size of c…

    Title: Spicing Up Your Verbs
    Location: reading corner.
    Age of children: 4th grade
    Size of class: 2 -30 students
    Prior assessment:
    We will identify writers that repeatedly use the same verbs in their writing. Any student who uses the same verb more than three times in a short piece of fiction should have this lesson.
    Materials:
    Previous fiction writing by the students, pencils, assembled “spicy verbs rack” (spice rack, empty spice jars, “boring” verbs labels, “spicy” verbs strips); In the Small, Small Pond (any book featuring vivid verbs would work); fifteen books that repeatedly use words from the “boring” verbs list
    Objectives:
    By the end of this lesson the students will be able to:
    1. identify several over-used verbs: answer, ask, cry, eat, laugh, run, and walk.
    2. identify several synonyms of these verbs
    3. substitute a more colorful synonym for these over-used verbs.
    PSM: The students will write new words.
    The students will successfully handle the spice rack.
    COG: The students will demonstrate the ability to substitute colorful verbs for over-used verbs.
    AFF: The students will work together during guided practice.
    The students will listen to each other’s sentences and offer constructive criticism.
    Set-Up:
    Steps for creating the “spicy verbs rack:” Put the “boring” verbs labels on the outside of empty spice jars. Put the “spicy” verbs strips inside the spice jar corresponding with the strips. Arrange the spice jars on the rack so that the labels are visible.
    Context:
    Beginning writers tend to stick to familiar, easy verbs. As a result, these verbs (such as eat, talk, walk, run) become monotonous in their writing. I would like to encourage my students to use synonyms for these verbs to provide variety in their writing.
    Introduction:
    “I was looking through your short stories and noticed the same couple words coming up repeatedly. All of you used the same verbs over and over again. I’m going to call those the “boring” verbs. Although these verbs work, they get a little “boring” after reading them repeatedly. I am going to teach you how to “spice” up your writing by substituting more colorful, “spicy” verbs for these over-used, “boring” verbs.”
    Demonstration/Modeling (Read-Aloud):
    We will read a book In the Small, Small Pond that features colorful, vibrant, spicy verbs. We can stop on several pages and say, “look at all of the spicy verbs.”
    After reading In the Small, Small Pond, we will explain the spice rack to students. We have spice jars labeled with “boring” verbs; inside are more colorful alternatives that you can use. Whenever you want to use one of the seven “boring” verbs, grab a spice jar and pull out another word that may work better.
    Shared Demonstration:
    We will get a book that repeatedly uses the same verbs. We will have the students work together as a class to add “spicy” verbs. We will do this for roughly three to four pages. The students can literally come to the spice rack, find the over-used verb, and pull another word out of the jar to substitute.
    Questions:
    1. Can you identify an over-used verb on this page?
    Guided Practice: We will have ten books that repeatedly use common verbs such as eat, cry, laugh, walk, and run. The students will work in pairs to substitute “spicy” verbs for the over-used verbs. We will walk around listening to the students during this time and guiding them when necessary.
    Directions:
    1. Find a partner.
    2. Have one person from each group choose a book from the table.
    3. Take turns reading one page aloud.
    4. After reading the page, the person who read should identify one over-used verb on that page.
    5. The same person should then say several “spicy verbs.”
    6. When that person is done, the other person gets a turn.
    7. Repeat until time is up.
    Questions:
    1. Did your partner identify an over-used verb on this page?
    2. What verbs did you substitute?
    3. How many substitute words did you come up with?
    Independent Practice:
    We will have students get a piece of writing they are already working on and have them located over-used verbs and substitute more colorful alternatives.
    Directions:
    1. Get a piece of fiction from your writing folder.
    2. Locate at least three of the “boring” verbs in your writing.
    3. Replace them with one of the “spicier” verbs from the spice rack or with another verb of your choice.
    Questions:
    1. Which “boring” verbs did you locate?
    2. Which “spicy” verbs did you substitute?
    3. Which sentence do you like better?
    Sharing/Reflection:
    The students will share one sentence from their writing that they altered to include a “spicy” verb. This will provide one form of evidence that they have learned the concept. I will also monitor their future writing assignments, watching for the use of more colorful verbs.
    This lesson is underlied by the theory of cooperative learning. Cramer states that “Cooperative learning can be an important part of writing” (Cramer, 2000, pg.124). By having the children work in groups, they will be participating in peer revision. Students can benefit in three ways from peer revision: it improves writing, it helps students develop standards for judging the quality of their own writing, and it broadens the audience for writing. (Cramer, 124) When Cramer discusses the many terms of revision, he speaks of the key terms that help aid in better writing. Student have the opportunity to learn to revise, edit, proofread, rewrite, and reformulate their papers. By having the children do this mini lesson in groups, they will be able to see the multiple ways in which verbs can be used and also become aware of the different kinds of verbs. (Cramer, pg. 104)
    Books featuring “spicy” verbs:
    Fleming, D. (1993). In the Small, Small Pond.New York: Henry, Holt, and Company,
    Inc.
    Lithgow, J. (2004). Carnival of the Animals. New York: Simon and Schuster.
    Kirk, D. Snow Dude. New York: Hyperion Books for Children.
    Plourde, L. (2002). School Picture Day. New York: Dutton Children’s Books.
    Boring Verbs: answer, ask, run, walk, eat, cry, laugh
    Spicy Verbs:
    Answer: reply, retort, agree, disagree, respond
    Ask: question, request, nag, pester, beg, plead, interrogate, demand
    Run: sprint, jog, lope, scuttle, scamper, dart, dash, scurry, rush, hurry
    Walk: saunter, stroll, amble, march, stride, toddle, totter, stagger, strut, move,
    Eat: gobble, scoff, wolf, munch, chomp, consume, devour, gorge, swallow,
    Cry: sob, weep, blubber, snivel, whimper, bawl, howl, wail, shed tears
    Laugh: chuckle, snicker, hoot, giggle, snort, cackle, chortle, guffaw,
    Lithgow, J. (2004). Carnival of the Animals. New York: Simon and Schuster.
    Kirk, D. Snow Dude. New York: Hyperion Books for Children.
    Plourde, L. (2002). School Picture Day. New York: Dutton Children’s Books.
    Works Cited:
    Cramer, R.L. (2000). Creative Power: the Nature and Nurture of Children’s Writing.
    New York: Allyn.

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    6:22 am

Wednesday, November 18

  1. page Child's Creativity in Transmediation - Ideal Language Arts Program edited Kayley Dull and Tyler Elvey LLED 401 November 17, 2009 Synthesis – Ideal Language Arts Program …
    Kayley Dull and Tyler Elvey LLED 401
    November 17, 2009 Synthesis – Ideal Language Arts Program
    Child’s Creativity in Transmediation
    We decided to take a part of our ideal language arts program, child’s creativity in transmediation, and focus more directly on that. Transmediation is the process of recreating the meaning of a text from one medium to another. Transmediation can be recreated using many different sign systems, such as photography, music, art, dance, video, comic, podcast, website, and many others. A child’s creativity can be enhanced using many of these different sign systems. The materials available to children in today’s society allow this enhancement of creativity.
    However, our current education system does not necessarily engage in children’s creativity in the classroom. In her book, Integrating the Arts Across the Elementary School Curriculum, Phyllis Gelineau explains that current instruction in the classroom is directed more towards the “left side” of the brain rather than the “right side” of the brain. The left side of our brains is used for reading, hearing, speaking, math, logic, time management, and verbal memory. Our right side is used for visual memory, spatial perception, visualizing, synthesizing, insight, and understanding analogies and metaphors. A possible solution to this problem is to move instruction from test-based to a balance between testing and creativity. Children’s knowledge should not necessarily be assessed just on logic, but logic and exploration using transmediation as a central guide for exploration.
    For children to be creative, it is important that they become risk takers. R. Phyllis Gelineau talks about Michael LeBoeuf’s book, Imagineering. LeBoeuf states, “More good creative ability is wasted due to fear than anything else. People with good voices are afraid to sing, those with artistic talents hide their paintings, writers are too embarrassed to show their writing to anyone.” It will be our job as the teacher to encourage our children to become risk takers while they are exploring each sign system. We have to give the students the tools and make them feel comfortable while creating the projects and publishing them.
    Let’s explore the sign system of photography. Technological advances in photography from just plain black and white to color, digital, re-mastered black and white, and computerized photographs give children endless topics to write about just from a simple photograph. A picture is truly worth a thousand words. There is also terminology to go along with interpreting photographs. By understanding this terminology, children can possess multiple ways to respond to a photograph. Some of the terminology includes top, bottom, left, right, vector, gaze, colors, exaggeration, and center. A vector, for example, is the line that separates the grass from the sky. It separates the real from the ideal (Hartse, 55). Black is an example of a dominant color in a photograph. It stands out by itself when blended with lighter colors. One of the greatest activities involving photography is to give students a camera and have them be the photographer. Giving students the option to take a picture of anything they want opens the door to creative writing. The right side of the brain would definitely be at work here.
    Another sign system that is extremely important to implement in the classroom is art. Art offers hundreds of creativity pathways that students can walk and explore. A perfect example of how effective arts can be in the classroom is our own LLED class. Throughout the semester, our class has constructed posters to reflect many of our various assigned readings. An example is the myths about acquiring a second language (Power & Hubbard). Our class created posters that reflected the myths. A simple activity such as giving a child a piece of paper and markers and telling him or her to draw anything can make their imagination run wild. An important thing to remember when implementing art into the classroom at an elementary level is craftsmanship is not the most important priority. A child’s artwork should reflect his or her creative side as much as possible. It is possible for their artwork to mean something that only they can understand. As long as they understand what is in their artwork and can explain it, we feel that this sign system would be effective for them.
    In her article, “Music in the Classroom”, Jennifer Prescott concurs that students enjoy, gain nourishment, and build confidence through participation in music and the arts. Implementing music in the classroom can cover an array of subjects. For example, singing songs about math formulas can help students remember them better. Another example is that music can be divided into historical contexts. A history lesson can be incorporated with the popular music at the time of the lesson. Music can also be used for active engagement in the classroom. Children can move their bodies as well as their minds with music. Teachers can give a history lesson about a particular type of dance and actually have their children practice it in class. In today’s world, music covers hundreds of genres from classical to hip-hop. From these genres, there are endless ways music could be used in schools. A current and popular tool being used across the country is using hip-hop music to help children better remember terminology. Music also opens the mind to more creative thinking. In fact, a 2001 College Entrance Examination Board Study showed that students with coursework and experience in music actually scored higher on the verbal and math sections of the SAT than students who had little or no experience in music (Prescott). From this study, we believe it is imperative for schools to make music in the classroom a requirement when constructing curriculum.
    Transmediation in the classroom is so important because of all the sign systems that are involved. Teaching children multiple sign systems will increase their chances for success. Taking an individualized approach will help highlight the miracle that is each child’s contribution to our ideal language arts program.
    Gelineau, R.P. (2004). Integrating the arts across the elementary school curriculum. Belmont, CA: Thomson Wadsworth.
    Leland, C.H, & Harste, J.C. (1994). Mulitple ways of knowing: curriculum in a new key. Language Arts, 71(5), 52-59.
    Power, B.M., & Hubbard, R.S. (2002). Language development: a reader for teachers. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill Prentice Hall.
    Prescott, J.O. (2005, January). Music in the classroom. Retrieved from http://teacher.scholastic.com/products/instructor/Jan05_music.htm

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    9:11 am

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